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The Walkway Over the Hudson

The Walkway Over the Hudson crosses the Hudson River and connects the city of Poughkeepsie in Dutchess County with Highland and the Town of Lloyd in Ulster County, New York.  There is an entrance on each side of the walkway in Poughkeepsie and Highland.

The bridge known as The Walkway Over the Hudson first opened in 1889 and was known back then as the Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge.  It was used to transport western raw materials to eastern industrial locations.  It accommodated freight trains as well as passenger trains.  At that time it was the longest bridge in the world.

Interesting to note that the bridge was painted black to make it less visible in case of an attack during World War II.  The painting stopped in the 1960’s.

A fire destroyed the tracks in 1974 and was probably caused by a spark from a train’s brakes.  The bridge was rebuilt and re-opened in October 2009, thanks to the efforts of a dedicated friend’s group, the Dyson Foundation, many donors and New York State.  At that time it was renamed the Walkway Over the Hudson. 

 

Walkway Over the Hudson at Sunrise

24x18 Oil on Canvas – painted from photograph taken by Fred Schaeffer

by Rose Gennaro

***Prints of this work available at Walkway.org/shopall proceeds go to benefit the Walkway***

 

 

 The Walkway Over the Hudson is 212 feet above the Hudson River, with a one-way distance of 1.28 miles.  It boasts scenic views as far as the Catskills to the north and the Hudson Highlands to the south.

The Walkway is part of the Hudson Valley Rail Trail Network, and it connects Ulster County’s Hudson Valley Rail Trail to the William R. Steinhaus Dutchess Rail Trail.

Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge

The Walkway welcomes more than 500,000 visitors annually from all over the world who enjoy walking, cycling and running amidst its scenic beauty.

Photograph taken by Fred Schaeffer during one of his daily walks at sunrise on the Walkway Over the Hudson.

Today, the Walkway is operated and owned by NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the NYS Bridge Authority. It is open year-round, offering programs, events and tours made possible through membership and donations to the Walkway organization.

Today, the Walkway is operated and owned by NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the NYS Bridge Authority. It is open year-round, offering programs, events and tours made possible through membership and donations to the Walkway organization.

Walkway at Sunset

11 x 14 Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

I painted this from a photograph I took on the Walkway Over the Hudson in Poughkeepsie, NY at sunset.  I loved the reflection on the Walkway railing and the way the sun reflected in the water against the dark mountains and foreground.

***Prints of this work available at Walkway.org/shop – all proceeds go to benefit the Walkway***

Mid-Hudson Bridge from Walkway

11 x 14 Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

I painted from a photograph I took on th Walkway Over the Hudson in the Fall.  View is looking towards the Hudson Highlands with the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

 

View from Walkway in Summer

11 x 14 Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

I painted this on location from the Walkway Over the Hudson in the summer, from the Poughkeepsie side of the river. This is my favorite view – you an see the Catskills in the distance,

Dramatic Sky on Walkway Over the Hudson

9x12 Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

Painted from a photograph I took at sunset while on the Walkway Over the Hudson.

View from Walkway in Fall

14 x 11 Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

 

I painted from a photograph I took in the Fall on the Walkway Over the Hudson in Poughkeepsie, NY.  It’s my favorite view on the Walkway – you can see the Catskills in the distance.  This is on the Poughkeepsie side, walking towards Highland.

 

In the Midst of the Storm: Covid-19

24x18″ Oil on Canvas

By Rose Gennaro

In the beginning of March 2020, I felt an extraordinarily strong urge to do a painting about the Coronavirus.  At the time New York City had just become the epicenter of the virus.  The first painting I did was in the Hudson Valley – I used the Walkway Over the Hudson in Poughkeepsie as my setting.  The sky itself is very dark and ominous, which reflected what we were all feeling.  I wanted to show a glimmer of light and hope with the light in the painting, as well as a solitary person walking on the Walkway to show our isolation.”

 

View from the Walkway Over the Hudson in Fall

10x8 Oil on Canvas

by Rose Gennaro